181630+-ton ships were built for mackerel fishing, which were called jiggers.Economy and Industry, Maritime & Fishing Industry

Proctor brothers, Gloucester. The Fishermen’s Own Book, Comprising the List of Men and Vessels Lost from the Port of Gloucester, Mass. Gloucester, Proctor brothers, [c1882]. http://archive.org/details/fishermensownboo00procrich
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After President Jefferson’s embargo against foreign trading was lifted in 1809, Gloucester’s fishing fleet grew and its fishing industry rebounded. Jiggers were a type of vessel that used hook-and-line gear over the side to catch fish, as well as the name of the multi-hook “jig” used to catch fish. The jigger preceded the use of purse seines for mackerel fishing. In 1811, Gloucester was home to 208 fishing vessels with an average “burden” of 15.6 tons. By the middle of the decade, the fleet numbered 261 boats, 41 of which were less than two years old, with nearly twice the average burden of 30.7 tons. A ship’s “burden” is a measure of its cargo capacity, based initially on a 252-gallon “tun” (or barrel) of wine that occupied 100 cubic feet, and weighed about 2,240 lbs. (one long ton, or Imperial ton). The hold of a 30-ton ship thus carried about 3000 cubic feet of cargo space.

Proctor brothers, Gloucester. The Fishermen’s Own Book, Comprising the List of Men and Vessels Lost from the Port of Gloucester, Mass. Gloucester, Proctor brothers, [c1882]. http://archive.org/details/fishermensownboo00procrich
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