1921Glouceseter vessels were acquired for bootlegging liquorEconomy and Industry, Government and Public Service, Maritime & Fishing Industry, Crime

https://www.boatus.com. “The Real McCoy.” https://www.boatus.com/expert-advice/expert-advice-archive/2015/june/the-real-mccoy.
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Captain William McCoy was a skilled yacht builder and a clever rumrunner. In 1921, he came to Gloucester to acquire the Henry L. Marshall, which was able to carry 3,000 cases of liquor, re-packed into burlap sacks. He returned to Gloucester to purchase another vessel, Arethusa, which he renamed Tomoka. The law did eventually catch up to McCoy and he lost his two ships and was jailed. Despite it all, his illegal trade had been incredibly profitable. For over a year he had cleared $100,000 a month.

https://www.boatus.com. “The Real McCoy.” https://www.boatus.com/expert-advice/expert-advice-archive/2015/june/the-real-mccoy. Van de Water, Frederic Franklyn. The Real McCoy. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, Doran and company, inc. 1931.
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