1790 (ca.)Trade began with Surinam.People and Communities, Economy and Industry, Maritime & Fishing Industry, African American History

Cape Ann Museum Library & Archives
Hover over image to zoom

Surinam became a significant marketplace for salt fish because it was an inexpensive food source for the many enslaved plantation workers there. While Gloucester ships were trading in the West Indies as early as 1717, at this time Gloucester vessels became the primary suppliers of salt fish to Surinam in exchange for sugar, molasses, coffee, and cocoa. Sugar was especially needed for Gloucester’s rum refineries on the harbor. The Surinam Trade continued even after 1807 when the slave trade was made illegal by both Great Britain and the United States. 

Cape Ann Museum. “Gloucester’s Ties to the Surinam Trade.” http://www.capeannmuseum.org/surinam-trade/. Hurd, D. Hamilton (Duane Hamilton) ed. History of Essex County, Massachusetts, with Biographical Sketches of Many of Its Pioneers and Prominent Men. Vol. II. Philadelphia, J. W. Lewis & Co., 1888. http://archive.org/details/historyofessexco02hurd
Cape Ann Museum Library & Archives
Hover over image to zoom
67categories 1576total entries 400+years 865searches
1600165017001750180018501900195020002050